Comprehensive Addiction List

In addition to the many types of Process Addictions there are also more commonly encountered addictions to other substances.

 

  • Adderall is a central nervous system stimulant typically prescribed for ADHD and other attention/hyperactivity disorders. Adderall helps slow hyperactivity and impulse control in the brain.
  • Alcohol & Alcoholism – Beer, Wine, Liquor alcohol comes in many forms and is legal in most countries in the world. However this does not mean it is benign. Alcohol is physically addictive and detoxification is required upon quitting severe alcohol abuse.
  • Ambien – A trademark used for the drug zolpidem. Used to help induce sleep Ambien is prone to abuse.
  • Amyl Nitrate an alkaloid narcotic found in opium and produced from morphine. It is typically prescribed to treat moderate-to-severe pain.
  • Ativan – Ativan® is the brand name for Lorazepam, an anti-anxiety agent.
  • Bath Salts – Bath salts, also know as synthetic cathinones, are synthetic drugs that have quickly becoming popular among recreational drug users. Consisting of synthetic chemicals like mephedrone and MDPV, although each batch is different.
  • Clonazepam – Clonazepam is a prescription benzodiazepine typically prescribed to patients who suffer from seizures, anxiety disorders and panic attacks. Clonazepam decreases brain activity, making anxiety easier to manage
  • Cocaine – a central nervous system stimulant. Cocaine is widely abused and highly addictive.
  • Codeine – an opiate drug processed from morphine. Restricted in most countries but still often available over-the-counter, codeine has found its way into pop culture. The use of Sizzurp – a potent codeine/juice mixture often abused by teens is often glamorized. Don’t be fooled – Sizzurp can be deadly and codeine abuse can quickly lead to higher level opiate use and addiction.
  • Crack Cocaine – a hard smoke-able form of cocaine. Crack is highly addictive and has harsh side effects.
  • Darvocet – Darvocet is an opiate prescription used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. When taken as prescribed, even one single tablet can contain a near toxic level of acetaminophen, or Tylenol.
  • Demerol – Demerol is the brand name for meperidine, a narcotic prescription/opiate pain reliever. Demerol is often compared to morphine, as they both provide similar levels of pain relief. The drug works by attaching to the brain’s pain receptors, reducing pain. Demerol can be highly addictive.
  • Dexedrine – Dexedrine is a psycho-stimulant that produces amphetamine-like effects and enhances brain activity to avoid sleep. Dexedrine, which is typically prescribed to treat narcolepsy and Attention Deficit Disorder, was used on soldiers during World War II, and can is still used today in occupations that require long stretches without sleep, i.e. truckers.
  • Depressant Drug – any drug that suppresses the central nervous system.
  • Dextromethorphine – Dextromethorphan (DXM) is a cough suppressant found in many cold medicines. When used correctly, DXM reduces cough and can relieve pain. But when abused, it can be dangerous and addicting.
  • Dilaudid – Brand Name for Hydromorphone – a hydrogenated ketone of morphine, an opioid analgesic.
  • Ecstasy – either of two drugs used for their euphoric effects. The original ecstasy, a so-called designer drug, also known as MDMA, is an analog of methamphetamine (see amphetamine). The other drug is a substance also known as ma huang or ephedra; it was marketed as â- ecstasyâ- to promote the idea that it is a natural and safe form of ecstasy. The active ingredient of herbal ecstasy is ephedrine.
  • GHB – Gamma Hydroxybutyrate. A clear liquid taken for its euphoric and relaxing effects. Common at raves and other club parties GHB can be used as a date rape drug and overuse can lead to physical addiction and harm.
  • Hallucinogens – Hallucinogens are psychoactive alkaloid drugs that distort sense and perception.
  • Heroin – Heroin is an opiate drug that is derived from morphine. Morphine is found in the seed pods of Asian opium poppy plants. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, heroin is ingested in several ways, such as through injection, snorting and smoking. Regardless of the method of abuse, heroin addiction often occurs as a result of frequent use.
  • Hydrocodone – Hydrocodone is an effective antitussive (anti-cough) agent, and as an opiate it is also an effective analgesic for mild to moderate pain control
  • Inhalant – inhalants, like aerosol spray cans, markers, shoe polish, glue, cooking spray, and air conditioning refrigerant are typically household products that can be used to produce a high by inhalation.
  • K2 – K2, also known as “legal weed” or “spice” is a designer drug and synthetic marijuana that was created in the mid-90′s by a Clemson University chemist.
  • Ketamine – A general anesthetic given intravenously or intramuscularly and used especially for minor surgical procedures in which muscle relaxation is not required.
  • Klonopin – Doctors prescribe Klonopin to control or prevent seizures and reduce anxiety from panic attacks. Also known as clonazepam, this drug is a benzodiazepine, a class of drugs that is highly addictive.
  • Lortab – Lortab is the brand names for the combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen (Tylenol), and is a strong Schedule II narcotic and opiate painkiller.
  • LSD – LSD is a potent synthetic hallucinogenic that was originally experimented with to help aid in psychotherapy, enhance creativity and even cure alcoholism.
  • Marijuana – Marijuana (marihuana) Cannabis sativa L., also known as Indian hemp, is a member of the Cannabaceae or hemp family, thought to have originated in the mountainous districts of India, north of the Himalayan mountains.
  • Methadone – A potent synthetic narcotic drug, C21H27NO, that is less addictive than morphine or heroin and is used as a substitute for these drugs in addiction treatment programs. It may also be used for chronic pain management.
  • Methamphetamine – Crystal meth is a stimulant that is named for the crystalline structure it assumes during manufacture. The drug is most commonly smoked, but it can also be injected or taken in pill form. It is commonly created in homemade labs using common household ingredients and over-the-counter medicine.
  • Morphine – A bitter crystalline alkaloid, C17H19NO3·H2O, extracted from opium, the soluble salts of which are used in medicine as an analgesic, a light anesthetic, or a sedative.
  • Opiate – Opiates are a group of drugs derived from the Asian poppy seed, with an extremely high potential for abuse. According to the CDC, 12 million people in the United States abused opiates in 2010.
  • Oxycodone – Oxycodone is an opioid analgesic medication synthesized from thebaine.
  • PCP – PCP is a hallucinogen and sedative with anesthetic effects. It was developed in the 1950s as an intravenous surgical anesthetic. Its effects are trance-like, causing users to feel an “out of body” experience. PCP was originally used in veterinary medicine, but wasn’t approved for human use because of its ability to cause delirium and extreme agitation.
  • Percocet – Percocet® is a brand name for a mix of active ingredients oxycodone, a narcotic (opiate) pain medication (analgesic), and acetaminophen (a non-narcotic pain medication), which relieves pain better than either medication taken alone.
  • Percodan – Percodan is a potent painkiller in the opiate family of drugs, used to treat moderate-to-severe pain.
  • Salvia – Salvia is an extremely strong hallucinogen that can produce strong, sometimes manic effects. The drug is gaining in popularity among young people, especially males in their twenties. Users typically smoke the dried leaves or add salvia in liquefied form to a drink.
  • Spice – Spice, also known as “legal weed” or “K2″ is a designer drug and synthetic marijuana that was created in the mid-90′s by a Clemson University chemist. The chemical can be sprayed on herbs, flowers and tobacco leaves, and then smoked to produce marijuana-like effects.
  • Stimulant Drug – any drug such as cocaine or crack that stimulates the
  • Valium – Valium® is a common brand name for Diazepam.
  • Vicodin – a combination of hydrocodone-an opiate-and acetaminophen, for the relief of moderate to severe pain.
  • Xanax – Xanax® is a brand name for Alprazolam, a short acting Benzodiazepine

Sources:
http://www.drugabuse.com

http://www.drugandalcoholrehab.net


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